Salt marsh research warns of pumpkin-colored ‘zombies’

Salt marsh research shows that growing abundance of tiny shrimp infected by a microscopic parasite may portend future threats to humankind through disease. Source: Invasive Species News...

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Lynx could survive if returned to Isle Royale, study suggests

By Eric Freedman The predator has not been on the island since the 1930s. Source: Great Lakes Echo...

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Disease-carrying mosquitoes abound in deforested lands

UF scientists synthesized and examined data from prior studies that had looked at how many pathogen-carrying mosquito species made their homes in forested lands vs. non-forested lands in 12 countries worldwide, including the United States. Source: Invasive Species News...

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Government and farmers team up to fight Great Lakes algae blooms

By Steven Maier The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative has been funding states and counties for years, trying to create buy-in from farmers in the fight against dangerous algae blooms. Starting in November the Great Lakes Commission will ask, “is it working?” Source: Great Lakes Echo...

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Indigenous Nations’ environmental stewardship in tackling invasive species

As invasive species are threatening ecological habitats throughout the US and Canada, the role of Indigenous nations as environmental stewards has often been overlooked, according to a new study. The findings provide examples of the many ways Indigenous nations are adapting to invasive species, documenting their impact and implementing active response strategies based on...

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US Olympians at 2016 Rio Games were infected with West Nile virus, not Zika

US Olympic and Paralympic athletes and staff who traveled to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the 2016 Summer Games did not become infected with Zika virus but did test positive for other tropical, mosquito-borne viral infections, including West Nile Virus, Dengue Fever and Chikungunya. Source: Invasive Species News...

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DNA barcoding technology helping monitor health of all-important boreal forest

The Boreal forest is essential to Canada and the world, storing carbon, purifying water and air and regulating climate. But keeping tabs on the health of this vulnerable biome has proven to be a painstaking and time-consuming undertaking – until now. Cutting-edge DNA metabarcoding technology can help speed up and improve the monitoring process, according to a new...

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Deer prefer native plants leaving lasting damage on forests

When rampant white-tailed deer graze in forests, they prefer to eat native plants over certain unpalatable invasive plants, such as garlic mustard and Japanese stiltgrass. These eating habits lower native plant diversity and abundance, while increasing the proportion of plant communities made up of non-native species, according to a new study. Source: Invasive Species...

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A Stick Insect. A Tree Lobster. Whatever You Call It, It’s Not Extinct

By By JOANNA KLEIN A genetic analysis showed that a stick insect found on another island was the same species as one that had been wiped out by rats on Australia’s Lord Howe Island. Source: Invasive Species News...

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Canadian scientists track big snakes in trees

By Carin Tunney Canadian researchers are tracking a large, endangered snake that lives in trees. Source: Great Lakes Echo...

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